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University of Utah    
 
    
 
  Sep 22, 2017
 
2017-2018 General Catalog

World Languages & Cultures, M.A.


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World Languages & Cultures
languages.utah.edu/graduate/ma/
801-581-7561

Specific Degree Information


The Department of World Languages and Cultures offers an M.A. in World Languages and Cultures with specializations in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, French, or Spanish. The degree requirements vary depending on which area a student chooses. See below for more information on each individual emphasis. For more information about each program, please visit the department’s website click here.

Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies


Through the MA in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, students explore texts and meaning across world cultures. With its methodology based in the idea that new insights about our world traditions are illuminated when they are compared and contrasted, the program promotes cross-cultural and interdisciplinary analysis. Within the Department of World Languages and Cultures students have access to specialists who work in European, Asian, Latin American, and Middle Eastern cultural traditions. We are also affiliated with richly interdisciplinary programs such as Asian Studies, Latin American Studies, and the Middle East Center. In their courses, faculty offer students various critical frameworks through which to link and/or interrogate national traditions. Our challenge is to overcome conventional national and linguistic divisions, and produce scholars with a new vision of world aesthetics. For more information please visit the CLCS M.A. website.

Minimum Degree Hours: 30 graduate credit hours

Admission Requirements


All MA students holding a Teaching Assistantship (TAship) must attend a week-long teacher-training session immediately before each Fall Semester. Required sessions may differ depending on whether the student is teaching a language course, assisting in a CLCS course taught in English, etc. 

Required Coursework


All CLCS MA students will take a minimum of 13 courses, which must include 6 credits of thesis research ( two thesis “courses”) and:

Completing Your Degree


The Masters Thesis:

The CLCS MA thesis may take a variety of forms. Students may write a traditional thesis of approximately 60-100 pp.; alternatively, they may produce a shorter (25-30 pp.) scholarly essay that must be deemed by the student’s advisory committee to be suitable for submission for publication in an academic journal. In exceptional cases, other forms of the thesis may be approved. In all cases, the thesis must meet scholarly standards of critical analysis, research, and proper use of secondary sources.
The student establishes a committee of three faculty members (including a thesis chair) during the spring semester of their first year. No later than the end of this semester, students will submit a Thesis Proposal to their committee. Students are expected to conduct substantial research for their essay during the summer between the first and second year of their program. A student’s committee will be responsible for evaluation of the acceptability of the student’s thesis work. In the second year of their program, the student will register for two sections of the following course (can be taken in one semester or spread over two):

6970 Thesis Research: Masters (3 credits each section = 6 credits).

Toward the end of the fourth semester, the student will present herself for a public thesis defense to be conducted by the thesis advisory committee.

Language Proficiency


Language 1: At least one course in the target language of one of the language sections of the Department of Language and Literature at the 3000 or 4000 level (this requirement can be met before beginning the CLCS Masters Program, for example, by completing an undergraduate language and literature major or minor).

Language 2: Completion of 2020 in one of the languages offered by the Department of World Languages and Cultures or a PhD Reading Course (this requirement can also be met before beginning the CLCS Masters Program)

French


Our distinguished faculty have a wide range of teaching and research interests, and together cover all periods of French and Francophone literature and culture and language studies. All of our graduate classes are discussion-based seminars, so students enjoy a communal approach to education and forge meaningful intellectual relationships with their professors. As a Teaching Assistant (TA), you will also be trained in the latest advances in second-language pedagogy. The University of Utah has an excellent research library, rare book collection, film and video collection, and Fine Arts Museum.

The French Studies program of the Department of World Languages and Cultures is committed to offering students a truly eclectic forum for the study of literature and culture. Our approach is multicultural and interdisciplinary. Graduate students in French work alongside students in German, Spanish, and Comparative Literature. We draw our diverse student population from North America, Europe, and Africa. For more information please visit the French M.A. website.

Minimum Degree Hours: 30 graduate credit hours

Admission Requirements


A bachelor’s degree in French literature and culture, or a strong undergraduate record in Humanities if the Bachelor’s degree was obtained in another academic subject.

A cumulative GPA of 3.0. Liberal Education courses covering prominent works of literature and philosophy will strengthen an applicant’s eligibility.

Significant deficiencies in this preparatory coursework must be made up before admission into M.A. status; for minor deficiencies, admission is possible but “make-up” courses may be added to the degree requirements.

Required Coursework


Two core courses (Bibliography and Research, Literary Theory and Criticism), and six to seven courses in the area of specialization; one or two of these courses, possibly more in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, may be replaced by approved courses. Students writing a thesis must register for thesis-research credit hours.

Our MA students take a minimum of 10 department courses, including the following core courses:

Completing Your Degree


Comprehensive Oral Exam: Each student must pass a Comprehensive Oral Final Exam at or near the completion of coursework. This Comprehensive Exam will be based on the French M.A. reading list. Students are expected to begin reading for this exam during the summer after their first year at the latest and will be give further advice about preparation in the fall of the 2nd year.

Language Proficiency


Students must prove “Standard Proficiency” (second-semester language course 1020) in one language other than English and French.

Academic Advising


During the first semester of graduate work, the Director of Graduate Studies (DGS), in conjunction with the Section Coordinator, will be the student’s academic advisor. In late August, the student is to consult with the coordinators and get the written approval for all course work to be taken during the first semester, which will be placed in the student’s departmental file. By March 1 of the first year, the student will form a 3 member Supervisory Committee, in consultation with the Director of Graduate Studies. From then on, the Chair of the Committee will be the student’s advisor in planning her/his academic program and examinations.

Spanish


 The Spanish graduate program provides intensive training in the analysis and research of Latin American and Peninsular literary and cultural studies and language pedagogy. The Master of Arts in Spanish Literature prepares students to approach texts and cultural production from a variety of methodological and theoretical paradigms, and to conduct research in the field. Students will acquire knowledge of a broad body of canonical and non-canonical texts from Spain, Latin America and the Caribbean from an interdisciplinary perspective. Skills and knowledge developed in the MA program prepares students for continued graduate work in the humanities and other professional disciplines. Faculty areas of expertise are diverse and consider national, transnational and post-national perspectives on research areas including Hispanic cultural history, Afro-Caribbean music, indigenous literary trends, subaltern, environmental, and queer studies.

All of our graduate classes are discussion based seminars, so students enjoy a communal approach to learning and meaningful intellectual relationships with the faculty. Teaching Assistants will receive training in language pedagogy. The University of Utah has an excellent research library, rare book collection, film and video collections and access to numerous electronic data bases and resources. For more information please visit the Spanish M.A. website.

Minimum Degree Hours: 30 graduate credit hours

Admission Requirements


A bachelor’s degree in literature and culture, or a strong undergraduate record in Humanities if the Bachelor’s degree was obtained in another academic subject.

A cumulative GPA of 3.0. Liberal Education courses covering prominent works of literature and philosophy will strengthen an applicant’s eligibility.

Significant deficiencies in this preparatory coursework must be made up before admission into M.A. status; for minor deficiencies, admission is possible but “make-up” courses may be added to the degree requirements outlined below.

Required Coursework


Two core courses (Bibliography and Research, Literary Theory and Criticism), and six to seven courses in the area of specialization; one or two of these courses, possibly more in Comparative Literary and Cultural Studies, may be replaced by approved courses. Students writing a thesis must register for thesis-research credit hours.

MA students take a minimum of 10 department courses, including the following core courses:

Completing Your Degree


Format of M.A. Exam: All candidates will take a uniform comprehensive examination based on the MA reading lists revised in Spring 2008. Students may bring the following items with them to the exams: a dictionary, scratch paper, and a bland disk or CD-ROM.

Students will select 3 areas out of the 6 listed on the official MA Reading List, with the following conditions:
o At least one area must represent the period before 1700
o At least one area must represent the period after 1700
o At least one list must cover Peninsular Literature
o At least one list must cover Latin American Literature

Students will inform the Spanish Graduate Advisor in writing of her/his exam areas by October 30th. Once the student has expressed these preferences, no changes will be allowed. Written exams are 3 hours long and proctored over the course of 2 days. Within 1-2 weeks after the written exams an oral defense will complete the MA examination process. All exams will take place in March.

Language Proficiency


Students must prove “Standard Proficiency” (third-semester language course 2010) in one language other than English and Spanish. Completion of the MA Language Proficiency requirement will satisfy part of this language requirement.

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